Jawboning
Gary Waters

Blog

Jawboning

The First Amendment imposes stringent constraints on the government’s power to regulate speech, but the question of when the First Amendment prohibits jawboning—informal government efforts to persuade, cajole, or strong-arm private platforms to change their content-moderation practices—warrants more attention than it’s received thus far. Some forms of jawboning are probably best understood as a legitimate aspect of governance. Others are probably best understood as illegitimate, and possibly unconstitutional, efforts to manipulate or censor public discourse. 

This blog channel highlights the Institute’s ongoing research and education efforts related to jawboning.

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Federal Court in Texas Orders Caldwell County to Open Bail Hearings to the Public

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